ASX Shares: My First Dividend Stock payment

Caroline Mark

My ASX Share Portfolio: Performance Update!

It's been a big exciting year for me starting out buying shares really for the first time. The surprise has been how fun it is. Since I started in September I've investing in SIX ASX Stocks and I've got the basis of a share portfolio. 
 

How are my ASX shares performing?

Well, you can see for yourself! I'm down in total $95.53 but this screen shot doesn't show the $83 dividend paid from 100 NAB shares so I'm actually $12 in the red. All the stocks are going well apart from NAB which is down $443. I'm not worried about NAB as this is a long-term holding for me and I'm sure over time it will come back up. It has a new CEO, Ross McEwan (former CEO of the Royal Bank of Scotland) who is focused on getting the basics right. Let's hope his strategies work their magic.



My ASX Shares: Small Cap Panoramic entitlement share offer

An update on ASX Small Cap Panoramic - a lot has been happening! I didn't sell my Panoramic Small Cap shares when our analysts had advised as I only had 3,000 at the time. It raised the issue for me personally that I want to put more than $900 into a holding of shares as even with a 40% share price rise it didn't seem worth the transaction costs plus the tax I'd have to pay to sell.  You see, I'm learning!

Since then the action keeps rolling with this ASX small cap and I'm really enjoying watching all it's moves. I bought it at 30.9c in mid September and the share price whooshed up to 43c after a takeover offer. The Directors are recommending that you REJECT the takeover offer from IGO. Which means you don't need to do anything. (see front cover of document that arrived in the post).



But then came another envelope (yes, I do actually open my mail), for a 1 for 6 rights issue. This essentially means that I can buy one extra ASX share at 30c for every six that I currently own, so I just paid $150 for an additional 500 shares. It's currently trading at 33c (but it was at over 43c when we were told to take profits) which clearly I should have done. BUT, I'm buying some more shares and then if they go up again I'll have made more rather than less. 



We now have a Hold recommendation on this small cap stock. In it's last announcement it has dropped it's production guidance by 20-30% following the completion of the operational review by the new CEO. The most important news was that the integrity of the Savannah mine design and operating parameters was confirmed. The nickel price has softened as well and so with the production downgrade has come the need for the equity raising (which I just paid $150) as they look to raise a net $31m. The bottom line is the ASX listed small cap company still has good potential if the difficulties of Savannah North are overcome. It's still a hold and not a buy so I'm just going to sit on these ASX Shares and see what happens. I'd be interested in buying more at a later point if the opportunity arose.

ASX Dividend Stocks: NAB and my first Dividends paid into my bank account


In my ASX share trading bank account I'm $83 richer than I was. I bought ASX Dividend Stock NAB and the dividend payment of $83 has paid for 276 Panoramic Shares! I was paid the $83 for the 100 ASX dividend shares I bought in September for a total of $2,887. This is a dividend yield of 2.9% for six months, so if they pay this again it's just shy of a 6% yield. No bank account is paying that. But these dividend shares have gone down over $400 and I am in the red. weep weep. 

But I own 200 dividend paying shares so why didn't I receive a dividend of 83c for all 200 shares? Remember I bought the 2nd batch of 100 shares on 2 December but these are ex divs, yes, what on earth am I talking about... 
If you go to asx.com.au then search for your stock, then statistics, scroll down a bit and there is this neat little table showing you a lot of dividend history. 



In the table you can see that you get two dividends paid each year. The 'ex div date' is the date that you had to own the shares to get the dividend - in this case 14/11/19 and as I bought on 2/12/19 I don't get the dividend. In theory the share price should be lower (which they were). 

In Sept I paid $28.86 a ASX share and then on 2 Dec I paid $25.95 a share. So a $2.91 difference! It is lower still today at $25.30...., groan groan, $3.56 lower then where I bought it...

It was $24.80 last week and I'm deciding and watching and waiting if I should buy more NAB shares.

It's the week before Christmas and I'm not really flush with cash. The problem is, Trump tweets, Boris has a press anouncement and the markets goes a bit crazy. The price of the ASX shares I own MOVE. and not necessarily in the right direction. They really are strange times we live in and I find it so strange that a tweet by a politician has the power to move the value of my investments. But it doesn't mean that I'm wrong in investing. I'm sticking to it and buying quality companies and I'm not a 'trader' buying in for a quick profit. I couldn't cope. I'm watching and active but I'm for the long-term.

 What ASX shares am I going to buy next?

I'm wondering if I am going to buy more shares in an ASX stock I already own to build up my holding or do I buy a new ASX stock? At the moment I'm undecided. I'm aiming for a portfolio of about 15 ASX stocks

I'm thinking of more NAB to reduce my average price some more, I like Alumina and I'm watching Panoramic as well. 

Our Small Cap portfolio manager has also had an 18 % return on the portfolio of ASX Small Caps that he has chosen and in our Small Cap stock report tomorrow he is telling us which small caps he is buying and selling. After tonight's Christmas clarinet concert and inevitable champagne, I'm going to wake up tomorrow and find out what my next move might be!

About the Author

Caroline Mark

Caroline Mark is the Founder and Publisher at Under the Radar Report, which provides independent ASX share research to help build investor’s share portfolio. Under the Radar Report is licensed to give general share financial advice only (ASFL: 409518). The author is not licensed to give personal financial advice and this commentary is for general information only.

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